>Where The Puck Are We Going?

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I guess it could be said that at last week’s Globe 2010 Conference, people were watching their p’s and q’s…and f’s…and still finding a way to tell it.

One of the most heartening awakenings to come out of the conference was to see corporate leadership acknowledge the fact that we can’t solve these problems with the same minds that created them.

Indeed.

Nicholas Parker, Executive Chairman, Cleantech Group LLC, based out of San Francisco stated that, yes, much of these issues of fuel efficiency, GHG emission reduction and Climate Change are questions of technology. “The technology is interpersonal neurobiology.” [Meaning the way we think.] “This is the technology. [here he tapped his forehead] We’re not going to solve the problems with the minds that created them.”

He added that we need “hypergrowth in happiness.”

“Climate change is not a problem. It’s a symptom of a problem. We have an accounting problem. We’re liquidating the assets of our resources and calling it income…The failure to imagine the future is what’s getting us here. If you don’t know where you’re going, how can you get there? So, where the puck are we going?” he asked the large audience assembled to hear him and others speak on the Town Hall panel. “We are going to look back in 30-40 years and see that this was a much easier problem to solve than we thought. We need to think along the lines of an abundance economy and we need to be inclusive.”

Joining him in the discussion was David Runnalls, President and CEO, International Institute for Sustainable Development, Ottawa, Canada, “The fact is we don’t have much time. We have to make a major dent in GHG emissions by 2020. 2050 is too easy a goal because we’ll all be dead by then. We have to get going on this idea and do something with it. We can’t just fiddle around with it.”

Stay tuned for Globe 2012

Tony Manwaring, CEO of Tomorrow’s Company, London, UK noted the instability that comes from the world heating up – food scarcity issues, national security. He defined a green economy as one where “economic, social, spiritual and environmental capital are valued.”

He stated that “two years ago [the Globe Conference is every two years] we were talking about getting real. We need to bring the future into the present.” He shared that he missed his kids. An interesting point given that most of the panels were dominated by male speakers with a light sprinkling of the occasional woman and no kids were featured. Given that we are discussing to ad nauseum the future of the Earth’s resources, it would make sense to include in that discussion some of the people who will be around living on it. Or is that just my particular brand of logic?

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Filed under Chris Henderson, Cleantech Group, Green Blog Network, Greening Vancouver, Int'l Inst. Sustainable Development, Interface Inc, Lumos Energy, Minister John Yap, Shell Petroleum, Tomorrow's Company

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